Pope Francis, Catholics, and Christians in the news

No worries.  I find that Edmonton is kind of like NJ.  Some of the stereotypes are true but, if you look past that, there is a lot of cool stuff too.  I almost ran into an elk on my bike ride this morning.

It is a big move.  Previous Pope's have shoved this sort of thing under the rug with a compulsion.   These people, their parents and grand parents had atrocities committed against them by Catholic clergy. Confronting it in all its ugliness is a real change and takes balls.


GoSlugs said:


LOL

ETA:  Mtierney, if I have mischaracterized your position on this issue, I apologize. Please feel free to correct me.

I wouldn’t know where to begin the monumental task.


Sharing, just because. 


mtierney said:

The impossible dream?…..

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/05/15/opinion/polarization-disagreement.html

Does this mean that you won't be posting any of those offensive "cartoons" in your "Rose Garden" thread?


nohero said:

Does this mean that you won't be posting any of those offensive "cartoons" in your "Rose Garden" thread?

I think it is safe to say that as long as VP Harris is breathing she will continue to be painted green in mtierney's cartoons.  Saturday's massacre highlighted a dividing line in American culture and mtierney has made it clear which side of that line she is standing on.


According to the Fr. John Beal, a canon lawyer and professor at The Catholic University of America, Cordileone's ban is not believed to affect Pelosi's ability to take Communion outside of churches under the archbishop's purview.

"It applies only to ministers, ordained and non-ordained, in the Archdiocese of San Francisco," Beal told Religion News Service in an email, noting that it applies to diocesan leaders as well as those who belong to a religious order. "It does not apply outside the Archdiocese."

https://www.ncronline.org/news/people/banned-cordileone-san-francisco-pelosi-receives-eucharist-washington


From one San Francisco Jesuit, via Facebook, emphasis added:

John D. Whitney Sj

trnoea3c1l016 uya M8tM2 5lP:c2lmaci · Several months ago, when a number of bishops had threatened to deny the Eucharist to several baptized Catholics involved in public life, I heard from a young woman who I had known since she was born. She had come into the world dangerously premature, and in that first year of life I had visited her every day in the hospital. Now, in her first year of college, she felt disheartened about this vision of the Church, in which leaders would use their power to keep people from the table of Christ. In response to her sorrow, I wrote what follows. Today, as I minister among many women and men in my relatively new home in San Francisco, who feel the same way, I repeat the post--affirming that, like many of my peers who have been called (though unworthy) to be ministers at the table, I do not feel it is within my authority to bar the altar from those who come to it, called by Jesus Christ. The Eucharist is set before us as gift and food--the source of our conversion of heart, and not the reward for it. Let us pray for the Church, and the fruit of that conversion. But for now, here is a reprise of what I wrote:“I want to write a longer piece about those bishops who seek to keep some from the table of Christ, but for now I will say this: it is not your table (nor mine). Bishops, priests, etc. are neither the hosts nor the bouncers nor the ones who wrote the guest list. The Eucharist is the resurrected body of Christ given for the life of the world. Jesus Christ is the one who invites the guests ('all you who labor'); he is the host of those who come; he is the setter of the table; and he is the feast which is shared ('Take this, all of you. . .this is my body, this is my blood'). We are guests at the meal, and sometimes (by his calling) servers. So stay in your lane, please. The wait staff doesn’t get to exclude those who want to come. If you don’t like the company Christ calls (and, admittedly, it is a rag tag bunch of sinners, one and all), it’s you who need to leave the table, not them.”


You don’t know how glad I am a recovering Catholic…


Jaytee said:

You don’t know how glad I am a recovering Catholic…

Thanks for sharing. 


Rosemary Radford Ruether, 85

Rosemary Radford Ruether, a pioneering theologian who brought feminist, antiracist and environmental perspectives to bear on the traditional teachings of the Roman Catholic Church, died on May 21 in Pomona, Calif. She was 85.

Her daughter Mimi Ruether confirmed the death, in a hospital, but did not specify a cause.

Starting in the late 1960s, Dr. Ruether was a leading figure in a wave of progressive women theologians who, inspired by the feminist and civil rights movements, took on the church’s traditional male-centered doctrines.

Dr. Ruether, whose academic training was in patristics, the study of early church writings, argued that in the first few centuries after Christ’s death, the Catholic Church split into two parallel and often opposing tracks: the institutional hierarchy based in Rome and the faith’s global grass roots.

“To me Catholicism is a community of a billion people who represent a range of things, so I don’t identify with the pope,” she said in a 2010 interview with Conscience, a liberal Catholic magazine. “My Catholicism is the progressive, feminist liberation theology wing of Catholicism. That is the Catholicism that I belong to, that I am connected to around the globe.”


Evil is in the news, and I turn to the words of Fulton Sheen…

“America, it is said, is suffering from intolerance — it is not. It is suffering from tolerance. Tolerance of right and wrong, truth and error, virtue and evil, Christ and chaos. Our country is not nearly so overrun with the bigoted as it is overrun with the broadminded.”
Fulton J. Sheen 

“The refusal to take sides on great moral issues is itself a decision. It is a silent acquiescence to evil. The Tragedy of our time is that those who still believe in honesty lack fire and conviction, while those who believe in dishonesty are full of passionate conviction.”
Fulton J. Sheen

“There are not one hundred people in the United States who hate The Catholic Church, but there are millions who hate what they wrongly perceive the Catholic Church to be.”
Fulton J. Sheen





mtierney said:

Evil is in the news, and I turn to the words of Fulton Sheen…

“America, it is said, is suffering from intolerance — it is not. It is suffering from tolerance. Tolerance of right and wrong, truth and error, virtue and evil, Christ and chaos. Our country is not nearly so overrun with the bigoted as it is overrun with the broadminded.”
Fulton J. Sheen 

“The refusal to take sides on great moral issues is itself a decision. It is a silent acquiescence to evil. The Tragedy of our time is that those who still believe in honesty lack fire and conviction, while those who believe in dishonesty are full of passionate conviction.”
Fulton J. Sheen

“There are not one hundred people in the United States who hate The Catholic Church, but there are millions who hate what they wrongly perceive the Catholic Church to be.”
Fulton J. Sheen

Those passages aren't words of comfort, or of inspiration. Taken by themselves, they don't inspire action so much as they encourage closing oneself off from the world outside (not that Sheen was recommending that, but that's the impression from taking the passages like that).

And the middle passage seems a reworking of Yeats.

Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.


Wouldn’t be a surprise to me that the “very Irish” Bishop Sheen may have been influenced by Yeats who would have been a formidable presence in his life p. This biography snippet about Yeats rings familiar comparisons to the Bishop, himself!

“Born in Dublin, Ireland, on June 13, 1865, William Butler Yeats was the son of a well-known Irish painter, John Butler Yeats. He spent his childhood in County Sligo, where his parents were raised, and in London. He returned to Dublin at the age of fifteen to continue his education and study painting, but quickly discovered he preferred poetry. Born into the Anglo-Irish landowning class, Yeats became involved with the Celtic Revival, a movement against the cultural influences of English rule in Ireland during the Victorian period, which sought to promote the spirit of Ireland's native heritage. Though Yeats never learned Irish Gaelic himself, his writing at the turn of the century drew extensively from sources in Irish mythology and folklore. Also a potent influence on his poetry was the Irish revolutionary Maud Gonne, whom he met in 1889, a woman equally famous for her passionate nationalist politics and her beauty. Though she married another man in 1903 and grew apart from Yeats (and Yeats himself was eventually married to another woman, Georgie Hyde Lees), she remained a powerful figure in his poetry.

“Yeats was deeply involved in politics in Ireland, and in the twenties, despite Irish independence from England, his verse reflected a pessimism about the political situation in his country and the rest of Europe, paralleling the increasing conservativism of his American counterparts in London, T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound. His work after 1910 was strongly influenced by Pound, becoming more modern in its concision and imagery, but Yeats never abandoned his strict adherence to traditional verse forms. He had a life-long interest in mysticism and the occult, which was off-putting to some readers, but he remained uninhibited in advancing his idiosyncratic philosophy, and his poetry continued to grow stronger as he grew older. 

“Appointed a senator of the Irish Free State in 1922, he is remembered as an important cultural leader, as a major playwright (he was one of the founders of the famous Abbey Theatre in Dublin), and as one of the very greatest poets—in any language—of the century. W. B. Yeats was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1923 and died in 1939 at the age of seventy-three.”



mtierney said:
“There are not one hundred people in the United States who hate The Catholic Church, but there are millions who hate what they wrongly perceive the Catholic Church to be.”
Fulton J. Sheen

I can't think of anyone better than Fulton Sheen to explain to us why people dislike conservative Catholics as we enter the 30th month of the investigation into his relationship with the pedophile priests under in his employ while he was Bishop of Rochester.

Pope Francis offers so much inspiration and yet a dark force still leads some folks to turn to Sheen.


Fine words from 2019 and yet almost three years later, the investigation continues. A lot of smoke for there to be no fire.

In the meantime, tragic stories like the following continue to pile up.

Catholic News Agency: This Catholic family is asking Fulton Sheen’s intercession for a second miracle


Klinker said:

Fine words from 2019 and yet almost three years later, the investigation continues. A lot of smoke for there to be no fire.

In the meantime, tragic stories like the following continue to pile up.

Catholic News Agency: This Catholic family is asking Fulton Sheen’s intercession for a second miracle

So, a miracle is requested to avert to save the embryo.

Just wondering, why not pray to God to will that this not occur? That seems to be more efficient and workable than constant requests for miracles.


An interesting article on scholarly research into why Pope Pius XII chose to not speak out against the Nazis and their destruction of European Judaism.

https://newsnetdaily.com/deep-in-the-vatican-archives-a-scholar-uncovers-mind-blowing-secrets-2/


Cordileone has been passed over for promotion. The Archdiocese of San Francisco is traditionally the seat of a Cardinal.

The promotion to cardinal of Bishop Robert McElroy of San Diego, California, is significant because he has been an outspoken ally of Francis' pastoral approach in issues such as protection of the environment and a more welcoming approach to gay Catholics.

In making McElroy a cardinal, Francis passed over the conservative archbishops of San Francisco and Los Angeles, two large cities that traditionally had cardinals in the past.

https://www.reuters.com/world/europe/pope-appoint-21-new-cardinals-august-putting-stamp-churchs-future-2022-05-29/

The Vatican is often subtle. It may be no coincidence the naming of new cardinals occurs at this time.


The article reflects how easily a Pope, similar to Senators and office holders in this country, can become involved in political gamesmanship  and end up sacrificing larger moral issues, such as the Nazi and Fascist extermination of Jews in Italy as well as elsewhere in Europe.  Not my idea of a saint.

tjohn said:

An interesting article on scholarly research into why Pope Pius XII chose to not speak out against the Nazis and their destruction of European Judaism.

https://newsnetdaily.com/deep-in-the-vatican-archives-a-scholar-uncovers-mind-blowing-secrets-2/


Coverage of the 21 new Cardinals named by Pope Francis from the Times today…

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/05/29/world/europe/pope-francis-21-new-cardinals.html


The selection process for appointing Cardinals is not for the faint of heart — but Pope Francis is a master of the political chess game. 

https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/251408/what-message-is-pope-francis-sending-with-his-choice-of-new-cardinals


Making a better world.


Under the category, “learning something new every day,” I found this overview of a 1,000 year old institution…..

https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/251475/what-is-the-order-of-malta


From Days of Rage article today in TheCatholicThing….

“I don’t know if the Supreme Court will hand down its decision on Dobbs today. Or whether, when it does, as in Justice Alito’s leaked draft, it will reverse Roe v. Wade. What I do know is that whatever leeway the Court will give states to limit abortion will not lead to “mostly peaceful” protests, but to violence.

“Radical pro-abortion groups have already carried out attacks on pro-life counseling centers and there have been suspicious incidents around the country at churches. Those same groups have promised much more of this in the summer and fall, and are already organizing “Days of Rage.”

“Catholic churches are going to be a particular target because we’ve been the most visible advocates for the protection of all human life from conception to natural death. So it’s time for us to organize as well – not only bishops and pastors, but all Catholics – to be ready for what’s coming.

“We cannot rely much on our governmental institutions. Look at how they responded to the crazed young man who just threatened to kill Justice Kavanaugh. It’s true that police arrested and charged him – after he turned himself in. But little has been done to prevent someone else from trying to do the same thing.

“Because abortion is so politicized, Nancy Pelosi has held up legislation in Congress that would provide additional protection for the justices, their families, clerks and employees, saying “nobody’s in danger.” They are, of course, but to say so might upset the base.

“Meanwhile, the pro-abortion group Ruth Sent Us intimated in a tweet Thursday that it’s watching Kavanaugh’s wife Ashley, and knows where two of his children go to school.

The same pro-abortion group tweeted out Justice Amy Coney Barrett’s address, the fact that she goes to Mass daily, and sends her seven children to a local People of Praise school. (It has also called the Church “an institution for the enslavement of women.”)

“And Samuel Alito is in a safe house.

“This is straight from a Mafia playbook: “Nice little place you have here. Be a shame if anything happened to it.”

“If we were still living under the rule of law, whoever at Ruth Sent Us was responsible for the tweets threatening two SCOTUS justices would be in jail right now. That they are not – the media would be flagging it if they were – gives us a fair view into how protests and violence will be treated after the Dobbs decision drops.

“And it shows how Twitter, which is so sensitive about messages that make people not feel “safe” (some people anyway), will also behave. Along with other media.

*Outside . . . Pelosi’s house!

“Attorney General Merrick Garland has talked about such threats as intolerable in a civilized society. But where’s the action? Not just nominal protections for those under threat or investigations of violent groups, but the robust rule of law.

“There were only two armed officers outside Kavanaugh’s home when Nicholas John Roske arrived in the middle of the night. A more experienced would-be assassin or a determined group could have succeeded, which would not only be an outrage in itself, but would have put the Supreme Court and our whole system of government in a tailspin.”

Scary days ahead, worldwide, on so many levels …..



Watch this mtierney:

Any violence against anti-abortion activists is unacceptable, and should be met with appropriate response by law enforcement.

Easy! Now you do it -- tell us your response to Trump's incitement to violence and the fact that he and his party are continuing to push those same inciting lies.


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