PEX ???

A while ago I received some PEX that was leftover from a radiant heating project.  I have several questions about this stuff.

A)  Is there a difference between regular PEX and PEX for radiant systems?  Can they be used interchangeably?

B)  This stuff has been stored on an unused porch.  Some ªshort lengths") is loose and has been exposed to sunlight.  How significant would damage to this be?

C)  Some long lengths- still in original coils- have been stored in a cardboard box.  Is this reasonably usable?

Thanks for any insights


PEX may not be installed where its exposed to direct sunlight, hence, not stored where there's direct sunlight -- quite frankly that alone is reason to toss the stuff. If its in a box with no openings, maybe it's ok -- but do you really want to take a chance? 

A coil of 100' 1/2" is about $25 -- its really cheap.


@peteglider We have some exposed PEX in the basement. The windows are small, but sunlight does come through at certain times of day. Is this a problem?


BG9 said:
https://www.doityourself.com/stry/can-you-cross-pex-pipe-tubing

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/pex-piping-problems-failures-derek-bradfield

 Thanks.  Given the fragility, I am hard pressed to imagine why anyone would use this stuff.  Is it super cheap? Seems like one of those "$400 car will cost you $1000" sort of things.


GoSlugs said:


BG9 said:
https://www.doityourself.com/stry/can-you-cross-pex-pipe-tubing

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/pex-piping-problems-failures-derek-bradfield
 Thanks.  Given the fragility, I am hard pressed to imagine why anyone would use this stuff.  Is it super cheap? Seems like one of those "$400 car will cost you $1000" sort of things.

 I think it is all about $$$.


Pex is a very good product when properly installed.  The flexibility allows you to avoid extra joints in walls, which can  fail, and it can expand a little when frozen, although you shouldn't run pipes where they can freeze.  It is easy to work with and durable.

 I buried a line out to my garage and I was able to run 170 feet without a joint in the line.  I'm very happy with the product.  


I think the jury is still out on the long range worthiness of this product although installers love it because it saves SO much installation time which saves everybody money, -until maybe the fittings start to fail and walls need to be opened. Time will tell.

Personally, I think I'll wait about twenty years to see how it holds up in other people's homes, -of course I'll be pretty old and brittle myself by then.

Meanwhile, in answer to the OP's question, -I agree with Pete, -why take a chance?



steel said:
I think the jury is still out on the long range worthiness of this product although installers love it because it saves SO much installation time which saves everybody money, -until maybe the fittings start to fail and walls need to be opened. Time will tell.
Personally, I think I'll wait about twenty years to see how it holds up in other people's homes, -of course I'll be pretty old and brittle myself by then.
Meanwhile, in answer to the OP's question, -I agree with Pete, -why take a chance?



 I wouldn’t say so, PEX has been used in Europe since the ‘60s!  My former in-laws installed pex radiant heating and supply in their Vermont house in 80s without any problems.

It’s been shown that PEX is less prone to installer mistakes than soldered copper, and the homerun nature of PEX means there are no joints anywhere between the manifold and the fixture (unlike copper)

RichardR - I’m not a plumber, but avid DIY’r, a researcher by trade. Google what various manufacturers say (Sharkbite, uponor, etc). They refer to direct sunlight, uv exposure.  Personally I don’t think PEX in a basement is an issue.  But I’d be reluctant to run it in my garage, say, unless it were fully covered. Many times the garage door is open all day and the sun pours in.  


Sorry Pete, Didn't mean to misrepresent. -I really just meant that I agree with you about the sun-exposed PEX. Good to hear of the products' success elsewhere.


I believe that  Europe already has a 50 yr history of success with the product- in general.  As with so many things the devil is in the details.  Proper handling and installation are key.  I had no problem or qualms installing a water softener for a friend in SO using a couple of short lengths of PEX + Sharkbite fittings.  That was a couple of years ago.  To date I haven't heard of any problems with the job.

My questions really go to the issue of storage.  Loose stuff should really be tossed, but I'm toooo cheap.  can I use the lonh lengths(orig coils) stored in their orig cardboard carton?


Apollo_T said:
I believe that  Europe already has a 50 yr history of success with the product- in general.  As with so many things the devil is in the details.  Proper handling and installation are key.  I had no problem or qualms installing a water softener for a friend in SO using a couple of short lengths of PEX + Sharkbite fittings.  That was a couple of years ago.  To date I haven't heard of any problems with the job.
My questions really go to the issue of storage.  Loose stuff should really be tossed, but I'm toooo cheap.  can I use the lonh lengths(orig coils) stored in their orig cardboard carton?

 I think yes.  I have done that.  I have had coils hanging in my barn for years that I use.  


@FilmCarp,

Thanks, all I wanted to know.




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