There was a drone in my airspace!?

reservationgirl

I live in South Orange, a couple of blocks west of Seton Hall. This past Saturday night at 6:45 pm a drone zipped over and hovered high in the beautifully June-blue western sky directly in my sight line as my husband and I were sitting out on the patio reveling in the weather and admiring the yard oasis. It was very high, maybe 1000 feet, what do I know, but it must have been at least as big as my 5x3 patio table, legs and all. It hovered, looked off in our direction, looked down directly at us, looked back up and panned the mountain to the west, and then zipped away to the south. My husband insists that there’s no way to tell if it was actually looking atus, and he doesn't think it was, but it sure seemed like it!

In any case, it made me extremely uncomfortable. It was not a toy. It was invading my privacy bigtime. Of course I have to say ‘it’ because I don’t know ‘who’. This is a serious problem, don’t you think? 



yahooyahoo

https://whyy.org/articles/push-for-n-j-laws-to-cover-drones-over-schools-homes/

Citing a need to ensure state law keeps up with the latest technology, more than a dozen legislators are backing a measure that would add drone operators to New Jersey’s trespassing and invasion of privacy statutes.

The bipartisan legislation would treat drones hovering over private property the same as a person physically entering the property without permission of the owner. It would also apply to using drones to photograph or videotape someone without consent when “a reasonable person would not expect to be observed.”

The bill is just the latest effort by lawmakers to update state regulations to address unmanned aircraft commonly called drones. Another bill advancing in the Assembly would prevent drone users from attaching firearms or other weapons to their devices. Legislation already signed into law made it illegal to use a drone while intoxicated or to spy on a correctional facility.


yahooyahoo

https://www.state.nj.us/transportation/airwater/aviation/drones.shtm

An Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS), often referred to as a drone, is an aircraft without a human pilot onboard - instead, the UAS is controlled by an operator on the ground. Before flying an UAS in New Jersey it is the responsibility of the UAS operator to understand and abide by the rules governing UAS operations. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has exclusive authority over the use of airspace in the United States, including the airspace used by UAS/drones.

The New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT) licenses approximately 400 aeronautical facilities (pdf 3.6m) such as airports, heliports, balloonports and seaplane bases. UAS operators must give way and may not interfere with manned aircraft.

Effective December 21, 2015, anyone who owns an UAS weighing more than 0.55 pounds and less than 55 pounds must register with the FAA UAS Registry. UAS registration is valid for three years. UAS owners who do not register could face civil and criminal penalties.


reservationgirl

Who are you and how have I gotten this immediate detailed response, two-fold!,??? I'm happy for the information, but I'd still like to know from whom it came. 



yahooyahoo

I just googled and pulled it off the Internet.  Took about 30 seconds.

I know nothing about drones or the applicable laws (except what I read when posting above).


reservationgirl

Also, I know what you're saying; all I'm saying is that I think it's time to speak out against drones in my yard looking at me, or whatever. Moreover, it's time for a serious legislative discussion. I was wondering if anyone else agreed... 


reservationgirl

OMGoodness, I was happy to have that info, if it was accurate and factual, but I guess you're saying you can't be sure it is. Too bad! So, I'm wondering, do you think it's time for serious legislation of private drones?


yahooyahoo
reservationgirl said:
OMGoodness, I was happy to have that info, if it was accurate and factual, but I guess you're saying you can't be sure it is. Too bad! So, I'm wondering, do you think it's time for serious legislation of private drones?

Well, the first link is an article but the second link is from the State of NJ. If their website is wrong, then we have a problem.

Yes, I think there should be more serious legislation that restricts drones.  They should not be allowed to fly over private property below a certain altitude and they should not be allowed to fly over/around people under a certain altitude.  And punishment should be serious if laws are violated.


jamie

I am surprised they we haven't heard many drone complaints in the news - perhaps drone owners are afraid of retaliation.


reservationgirl

I would hope that this is a beginning...  Perhaps no one is complaining, perhaps no one sees it as a threat yet, perhaps no one sees the drones! My question is, what does it mean if they're there without our permission? I'm sure that the people behind the drones don't want interference. and want to avoid retaliation. My question is, is it ok, or should it be ok, in the USA,  that that unknown human entities through drones can invade my privacy this way? We need laws to govern this relatively new technology. But we won't get them if no one thinks they're important. Do you want intelligent drones in your air space? 


reservationgirl
yahooyahoo said:
Well, the first link is an article but the second link is from the State of NJ. If their website is wrong, then we have a problem.
Yes, I think there should be more serious legislation that restricts drones.  They should not be allowed to fly over private property below a certain altitude and they should not be allowed to fly over/around people under a certain altitude.  And punishment should be serious if laws are violated.

 And altitude is relative to the technological advance. Whatever the altitude, I don't want anyone looking at me without my permission. 


joanne
reservationgirl said:


yahooyahoo said:
Well, the first link is an article but the second link is from the State of NJ. If their website is wrong, then we have a problem.
Yes, I think there should be more serious legislation that restricts drones.  They should not be allowed to fly over private property below a certain altitude and they should not be allowed to fly over/around people under a certain altitude.  And punishment should be serious if laws are violated.
 And altitude is relative to the technological advance. Whatever the altitude, I don't want anyone looking at me without my permission. 

 We’ve got the same concerns here: when we went whale watching on the weekend (just locally, only about 10 nautical miles offshore), my brother didn’t quite get why his son’s drone probably wouldn’t be welcomed. (My nephew is 15+ and really into audio and film work) 

We’re way too complacent about these things.


mulemom

I agree that drone use needs to be better regulated.  This situation doesn't really affect someone's privacy, but a friend of mine who boards horses said a drone was buzzing low over her pasture a little while back, spooking the horses into galloping wildly around the field in terror, which could result in serious injury if a horse smashes into another or runs through a fence.  That would cause not only emotional trauma but also a potentially large financial disaster for the owner of the horse, as well as my friend as the caretaker.  The police told her there is absolutely nothing she or they can do unless the owner/pilot of the drone can be found, and how is that going to happen?


wedjet

We need more falconers.


ridski

Earlier this year, two people near my neighborhood were racing their drones over some open fields. These were definitely small ones, limited range, probably just holiday presents they decided to take out on a clear Sunday afternoon. Unfortunately I happened to be walking my already nervous dog, and these things were flying low, no higher than 40 feet, and they were LOUD, too and basically left my dog shaking and freaking out. I would have loved to have said something to the operators, but I was too busy dealing with my 60lb freaked out dog and just wanted to get her out of there. So for those who do have little fun drones, please think of those who really don't understand what these things are, or find somewhere you can't disturb other animals.


joanne

"please think of those who really don't understand what these things are, or find somewhere you can't disturb other animals."


We live near reserved remnant bushland, set aside for native animals and birds to remain in the area. It's bad enough they're contending with insane traffic (how can animals understand garbage trucks??? Especially those that empty the bins themselves?), and Christmas lights, but drones invading the quiet clear spaces or hovering above/around them are a whole new terror. Nesting and feeding patterns in endangered species have been critically disrupted around here and probably won't be re-established.

We've also got some early morning 'buzzing' from people at the sports field across the road not thinking about the effect on residents of our aged care/nursing wing. These residents are reliving horrific episodes from their war years, waiting for things to drop out of the sky and blast their home into little pieces. 


Jaytee

Any drone hovering over my yard will be shot down. 


peteglider

I'm having a hard time with this. 

So is it acceptable for general and commercial aviation to fly over our homes? What about weather and other imaging satellites which we know are daily taking pictures of our homes?

If someone parks in the street in front of our homes - does that mean they're infringing on your space?

To just assume that a drone that overhead is looking at you, that's likely just not the case. Just as a car sitting in front of your house isn't likely up to something nefarious (and if its a Tesla or other make with highest level of safety equipment, there are 6 or more cameras)

If you want to shoot drones down instead of clay pigeons, be my guest, but that seems like an expensive sport to me. ;-)


ridski

If someone parks in front of my house, they're getting towed. Not my fault you can't park there. Them's the rules.


yahooyahoo
peteglider said:
I'm having a hard time with this. 
So is it acceptable for general and commercial aviation to fly over our homes? What about weather and other imaging satellites which we know are daily taking pictures of our homes?
If someone parks in the street in front of our homes - does that mean they're infringing on your space?
To just assume that a drone that overhead is looking at you, that's likely just not the case. Just as a car sitting in front of your house isn't likely up to something nefarious (and if its a Tesla or other make with highest level of safety equipment, there are 6 or more cameras)
If you want to shoot drones down instead of clay pigeons, be my guest, but that seems like an expensive sport to me. ;-)

Pete, it's all about the altitude.  Obviously, if a commercial airplane is 5,000 feet above my house I'm not worried about it.  If a drone is 50 feet above my house, I'm worried about it.  


joanne

Drone altitude, and the noise. 


reservationgirl
mulemom said:
I agree that drone use needs to be better regulated.  This situation doesn't really affect someone's privacy, but a friend of mine who boards horses said a drone was buzzing low over her pasture a little while back, spooking the horses into galloping wildly around the field in terror, which could result in serious injury if a horse smashes into another or runs through a fence.  That would cause not only emotional trauma but also a potentially large financial disaster for the owner of the horse, as well as my friend as the caretaker.  The police told her there is absolutely nothing she or they can do unless the owner/pilot of the drone can be found, and how is that going to happen?

 Yes, exactly!


reservationgirl

I'm so glad that this discussion is happening. 

Mostly, everyone is talking about their experiences. Lots of bad and worrisome experiences. I'm wondering if there's anything to be done about it? Invasion of privacy, noise/disruption in the natural world, noise/disruption in a pet's world, in my world and my dog's world, scaring the **** out of me, looking at me or not ... 

I was hoping to be part of a solution... I'm wondering if anyone has any ideas about how to protect ourselves from this outside of our control 'new' technology which has no laws to guide it presently? 


reservationgirl
wedjet said:
We need more falconers.

Yes, and less drones... 


reservationgirl
joanne said:
 We’ve got the same concerns here: when we went whale watching on the weekend (just locally, only about 10 nautical miles offshore), my brother didn’t quite get why his son’s drone probably wouldn’t be welcomed. (My nephew is 15+ and really into audio and film work) 
We’re way too complacent about these things.

 It's exactly the audio and film work that is worrisome when not agreed upon by people...


reservationgirl
Jaytee said:
Any drone hovering over my yard will be shot down. 

 I'm not espousing anything to get shot in any way for any reason.


reservationgirl
Jaytee said:
Any drone hovering over my yard will be shot down. 

 I do not espouse shooting anything ever, unless it's for food...


reservationgirl
joanne said:
"please think of those who really don't understand what these things are, or find somewhere you can't disturb other animals."


We live near reserved remnant bushland, set aside for native animals and birds to remain in the area. It's bad enough they're contending with insane traffic (how can animals understand garbage trucks??? Especially those that empty the bins themselves?), and Christmas lights, but drones invading the quiet clear spaces or hovering above/around them are a whole new terror. Nesting and feeding patterns in endangered species have been critically disrupted around here and probably won't be re-established.
We've also got some early morning 'buzzing' from people at the sports field across the road not thinking about the effect on residents of our aged care/nursing wing. These residents are reliving horrific episodes from their war years, waiting for things to drop out of the sky and blast their home into little pieces. 

 So what can we do???


reservationgirl
joanne said:
"please think of those who really don't understand what these things are, or find somewhere you can't disturb other animals."


We live near reserved remnant bushland, set aside for native animals and birds to remain in the area. It's bad enough they're contending with insane traffic (how can animals understand garbage trucks??? Especially those that empty the bins themselves?), and Christmas lights, but drones invading the quiet clear spaces or hovering above/around them are a whole new terror. Nesting and feeding patterns in endangered species have been critically disrupted around here and probably won't be re-established.
We've also got some early morning 'buzzing' from people at the sports field across the road not thinking about the effect on residents of our aged care/nursing wing. These residents are reliving horrific episodes from their war years, waiting for things to drop out of the sky and blast their home into little pieces. 

 So what can we do???

joanne said:
 We’ve got the same concerns here: when we went whale watching on the weekend (just locally, only about 10 nautical miles offshore), my brother didn’t quite get why his son’s drone probably wouldn’t be welcomed. (My nephew is 15+ and really into audio and film work) 
We’re way too complacent about these things.

 Yes, what do you think we can do about it? 



In order to add a comment – you must Join this community – Click here to do so.

Sponsored Business

Find Business

Latest Jobs

Employment Wanted

Lessons/Instruction