Major Car system failure likelihoods.

Hi,

i have a 2006 Toyota Solara that is at 200,000 miles.  Last summer my daughter got stuck in Manhattan with having to get a new radiator...  ($2k)

This week it appears that the transmission is going.  (I am told that's about $3k to rebuild.)

What is the next major system to fail?  Anybody have odds?

If I spend the $3k how much longer before the next failure?????   

Don't really want to go new car shopping.  This toyota is the best most durable car I've had until now!

Best Regards,

Ron Carter


Our 2006 Toyota Matrix (less than 100K miles) just had major brake work, about $1,200 at Wisconsin prices.  There was rust somewhere by some fitting?

We are far from thinking about replacing it. 

fwiw, we have had good experiences with replacement transmissions, but those weren't Toyotas.

Good luck, Ron and family!


Does it have a timing belt or a timing chain.  If a belt, replace it now before it goes and bends rods.

Also look at the front end.  Your car has 200k on it.  Are those 200,000 highway miles, or local miles with potholes.  You might need tie rods soon.  My husband commutes to Newark in his car for 7 years, destroyed his front end, though overall the car is in great mechanical condition so we had the front end repaired.  On the other hand, if those are 200,000 smooth miles and you’re adept at avoiding potholes, you can easily go another 200k without any issues.  Road conditions and driving style are the biggest factors there.

I was lucky recently, I have a 2008 Honda Pilot that had a transmission issue.  Turns out it was just a leak, transmission itself is fine.  Cost me $200 to repair.  For a rebuild I was told to expect between $3k and $4k. 



That engine is a non interference engine, which means if the timing chain goes it will just stop, and not destroy the engine.  Still inconvenient, but not catastrophic.


FilmCarp said:

That engine is a non interference engine, which means if the timing chain goes it will just stop, and not destroy the engine.  Still inconvenient, but not catastrophic.

 Do all modern engines do that, or just certain ones?  I remember in the 90’s we had a Ford escort.  Timing belt went and the person who was driving wasn’t the best at stick, so when he stalled the car it basically destroyed the engine.  Car was older though, so the cost of repair was high vs the cost of replacement 


It depends on the engine design.


I found this, but most non-mechanics like myself won’t find it easy to figure out.  My Honda was a piece of cake, but my Mazda and Dodge I have no clue.  Though I believe the Mazda and Dodge both have chains and not belts.  Not that chains never fail, but they’re much less likely to fail compared to a belt 

http://yourcarangel.com/2014/07/interference-engines-complete-list/


rcarter31 said:

Hi,

i have a 2006 Toyota Solara that is at 200,000 miles.  Last summer my daughter got stuck in Manhattan with having to get a new radiator...  ($2k)

This week it appears that the transmission is going.  (I am told that's about $3k to rebuild.)

What is the next major system to fail?  Anybody have odds?

If I spend the $3k how much longer before the next failure?????   

Don't really want to go new car shopping.  This toyota is the best most durable car I've had until now!

Best Regards,

Ron Carter

If it's the V6 it's a timing belt and it's an interference engine, the 4cyl is a chain and it's non-interference.  On the plus side it's MUCH easier to do a timing belt than a chain, but it won't be cheap.

Used car prices have been driven up by the pandemic, you might be able to get some money for it as a trade or through a private sale.  Currently you can qualify for 0% 60 month loan on a new Camry, so maybe think about how many months of payments would be equal to the rebuilt transmission and timing belt job if applicable?


At 200k the transmission will start to let you know it’s old. Engine on toyotas are tough. Most people overlook servicing their transmission. Newer cars have sealed transmissions, meaning you shouldn’t change the fluids. I don’t believe that any car can go without at least changing the transmission fluid at least every 50k miles. If you’re having the transmission rebuilt have them replace the engine seal between the transmission and the engine at the same time. Timing chains can stretch. The guides they run in are mostly plastic and they wear outs. 
you still have years left on that car. 


Very appreciative of your comments!

Way out of my wheelhouse!


Have you had to replace your catalytic converter yet?  If you’re still on the original and are at 200,000 miles you may end up with that failing soon.  

ETA:  This isn’t meant to scare you into trading it in.  Personally I prefer to keep cars as long as feasible even with the extra repairs.  I’m just trying to think ahead to what may fail soon.


spontaneous said:

Have you had to replace your catalytic converter yet?  If you’re still on the original and are at 200,000 miles you may end up with that failing soon.  

ETA:  This isn’t meant to scare you into trading it in.  Personally I prefer to keep cars as long as feasible even with the extra repairs.  I’m just trying to think ahead to what may fail soon.

 Catalytic converters don’t go bad with age. If your car is serviced regularly the cats would never need changing. It’s because of misfires and unburnt gasoline or oil getting into the exhaust system that destroys the cat. The O2 sensors can last the life of the car if they’re not fouled up also. But O2sensors are usually the first to go. 
people have to be careful with crooked mechanics who sell these falsehoods 


Yeah, I just had my O2 sensor(s?)  replaced on my 17 year old Mercedes.  Kinda pricey for what must be a pretty simple repair. about $500, as I recall.

The converter is still the original though.


drummerboy said:

Yeah, I just had my O2 sensor(s?)  replaced on my 17 year old Mercedes.  Kinda pricey for what must be a pretty simple repair. about $500, as I recall.

The converter is still the original though.

 4 sensors? They’re about $75 each. And sometimes it’s difficult to get to them, especially the upstream ones. 


yeah, there are 4. Just looked it up. The accompanying video indicates that they're pretty accessible on my car.


drummerboy said:

yeah, there are 4. Just looked it up. The accompanying video indicates that they're pretty accessible on my car.

 That’s a very good video. Sometimes the sensors are so tight on there that you have to heat it up with a torch to loosen them. With Mercedes you have to install OEM sensors, which can run expensive if you have to get them from a dealership. I’m thinking $500 is a fair price. You have a decent mechanic or dealer that works on your car. Some shops would have told you the cats were bad since more than one sensors had failed.


At 200k, if you had an interference engine (and AFAIK you don’t) you’d have likely found out the hard way by now.  Having grenaded a Porsche 968 some years back, it’s a sickening noise and a VERY BAD thing. 

Besides the tranny and a full brake replacement, I’d fully expect suspension components to be up quite soon (control arms, bushings, etc etc). Checking for oil leaks and fuel consumption issues would also be a good idea if you haven’t already.  


Story has good ending for now!

First thanks to George Berkeley of UPS Fame for the referral:

Darren at SO Friendly Service, recently relocated to Burnet Ave in Maplewood behind Wooley Oil.

Darren ran some tests, studied the transmission fluid and based on both, today changed two sensors for $522.00!  And I was out of there from 8:15 to 10am this morning!

The fluid was clear and clean which led him to the sensors rather than deteriorating Transmission.

Whew!   Thanks to all for your input on what is likely to be NEXT after all it is Halloween season!

Their contact info:

SO Friendly Service

https://www.facebook.com/southorangefriendlyservice

Best Regards

Ron Carter




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