fox and falcon

als4532

i've had nothing but positive experiences so far at Fox and Falcon. Been there for brunch, dinner 3 times and drinks in all three bar areas, and I'll be going back often.


oots

in case anyone missed it-nj mag came out with their list of the hottest 28 restaurants in nj-which included fox & falcon


yahooyahoo

Hot?  By what criteria?


apple44
yahooyahoo said:
Hot?  By what criteria?

Doesn't seem any worse than the vague and overused word "best." The magazine states the list is based on "rewarding food, atmosphere, variety and value." 


Rob_Sandow

We ate at The Fox and Falcon for the first time tonight, although I had drinks in the bars previously.  I don't understand the menu.  It's very limited, and hit or miss.  My wife and I had martinis with a side of french fries to start.  The martinis are kind of small and the ones that are on the menu as specialty drinks are weak.  The fries came out undercooked and could have benefitteed from a few more minutes in the frier.  The food menu is very limited and some items are not easy to understand what they are due to foreign language without translations.  Others are expensive and tiny.  Meatball sliders were OK, but the scallop appetizer was tasty but horribly small for the price. 

On the other hand, the place was pretty crowded, so I guess there is a Saturday night market for it.  Seems like an OK place for drinks, if a bit on the expensive side, but I won't be going back for food until they improve/expand the menu.



Smedley

I hear anecdotally the place is often crowded, so good for them, but after trying it a couple times i concluded it’s not for me. Same reasons others have cited — limited menu, small portion sizes, big prices.

One bit on their menu encapsulates it for me. In the pasta section they highlight that *all noodles are bronze cut and imported by Marcelli Formaggi from Abruzzo, Italy;”.

I guess that would impress some people, but I don’t know what bronze cut is, I don’t know who Marcelli Formaggi is, and I don’t know where Abruzzo, Italy is. I’ll take a decent-sized and reasonably priced bowl of good pasta without the bells & whistles over a fancy $20 appetizer-sized portion any day. 


NoraCharles

I doubt I will ever go the fox and falcon because of the prices.  Way out of my range. But in the interest of pasta knowledge it seems bronze cut mean that the dies that are used by the manufacturer to manufacture and cut the pasta are made of bronze which makes for a slightly rougher and more porous pasta that sauce clings to better. Also a slightly more expensive pasta if I've got it right.

Longer Epicurious article here.

https://www.epicurious.com/ingredients/what-is-bronze-cut-pasta-and-is-it-worth-it-article


jeffl

I agree with the three posts above.  And any bar that uses a shot glass to measure my martini or Dewars is off my list.  Especially at those prices.  


STANV
Smedley said:

I guess that would impress some people, but I don’t know what bronze cut is, I don’t know who Marcelli Formaggi is, and I don’t know where Abruzzo, Italy is. I’ll take a decent-sized and reasonably priced bowl of good pasta without the bells & whistles over a fancy $20 appetizer-sized portion any day. 

 I now know what "bronze cut" is.

An important distinction in industrially produced pasta is made between bronze cutand Teflon cut – which refers to the molds, or “dies” as they are called, used in production. When Teflon dies are used, the resulting pasta is smooth and shiny.

Big deal! Now lets see who Marcelli Formaggi is.

Edited: Not a person, a company.

https://marcelliformaggi.com/

I have a general idea of where Abruzzo is.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abruzzo#/media/File:Abruzzo_in_Italy.svg





ridski
STANV said:
 I now know what "bronze cut" is.
An important distinction in industrially produced pasta is made between bronze cutand Teflon cut – which refers to the molds, or “dies” as they are called, used in production. When Teflon dies are used, the resulting pasta is smooth and shiny.
Big deal! Now lets see who Marcelli Formaggi is.









 They import cheese, and are based in Clifton.


Smedley
STANV said:

Now lets see who Marcelli Formaggi is.
Edited: Not a person, a company.
https://marcelliformaggi.com/

 Well totally forget it then. If Marcelli was some boss artisan pasta maker or something I might reconsider my bearish stance on F & F. But it's just a faceless corporation!


mikescott

I have been 4 times.  food has been good.  Smaller portions do not bother me (since I eat too much anyway), but I agree that the menu is too limited. All 4 times the place has been crowded (and yet to be there on a Saturday).   

I had the French Fries once -- and they were cooked correctly but would have sent them back if under cooked.  

The one time I had desert it was really good (forget what it was called).  

The prices seem to be in line with other places with similar quality of food and service.  Seems to me the prices at most restaurants have been increasing a lot in the past couple of years.  I also noticed that a lot of people get the burger -- $18.00 with fries.  The burger was very good.  So one night I went to BGR and had a burger with Fries which cost me $14.00.  For the extra 4 bucks I much preferred  F and F.   Of course when you add in a tip and a drink, BGR becomes a far less expensive option.  




jimmurphy

They lost me with the lowest-priced $18 glass of wine. Just an indicator of value.


jeffl

They actually have a $13 Pinot Grigio. The other wines start at $17, but they are a quartino, which is larger than your average glass. 


jimmurphy

OK, they've come down on one glass. Santa Margherita is 20 bucks a bottle. Smaller pour than a quartino.  Still, what, a 5-6X markup? 

If they're packed and the market bears this, fine, but I don't think they are.

Just too much, this ain't Manhattan.


jeffl
jimmurphy said:
OK, they've come down on one glass. Santa Margherita is 20 bucks a bottle. Smaller pour than a quartino.  Still, what, a 5-6X markup? 
If they're packed and the market bears this, fine, but I don't think they are.
Just too much, this ain't Manhattan.

 I’m not a fan of the place but if you’re going to criticize it, you should be accurate.  Their pours are quartinos.  They have more than one wine for $13 and most of the other glasses are $17, not $18.  Yeah, it’s expensive, but don’t overstate it.  


jimmurphy

Fair Jeff. Wasn’t’t trying to mislead. 

I took your ““a” $13 Pinot Grigio” to mean that was the only one. Was relying on previous reports that 18 bucks was the general price point. 17 is not much different to me.



jeffl
jimmurphy said:
Fair Jeff. Wasn’t’t trying to mislead. 
I took your ““a” $13 Pinot Grigio” to mean that was the only one. Was relying on previous reports that 18 bucks was the general price point. 17 is not much different to me.


 No problem, Jim.  I’m in agreement that drinks are too expensive. 


mikescott

Papillion 25 is one block away, has been in business for many years and has similar prices (with a noisy bar in the front).  


apple44

I agree it's pricey, but I find that's true with almost all of the great new places in the area and in other towns.

Owners spend a lot on rent (or buying a building), a ton on renovations, and liquor license costs are insane. I don't know how one can open a large place in a central area of SOMa and keep costs down.

Some folks keep asking when the "beer garden" (a restaurant and event space in the old Village Hall) is going to open. But what are people expecting? After spending a ton of money renovating an old, dilapidated building (which wasn't designed to be a restaurant in the first place), I'm guessing they're not going to be serving $3 PBRs.


mrincredible
apple44 said:
I agree it's pricey, but I find that's true with almost all of the great new places in the area and in other towns.
Owners spend a lot on rent (or buying a building), a ton on renovations, and liquor license costs are insane. I don't know how one can open a large place in a central area of SOMa and keep costs down.
Some folks keep asking when the "beer garden" (a restaurant and event space in the old Village Hall) is going to open. But what are people expecting? After spending a ton of money renovating an old, dilapidated building (which wasn't designed to be a restaurant in the first place), I'm guessing they're not going to be serving $3 PBRs.

350K is apparently the average liquour licence cost in NJ. 

I love the beer hall place in Asbury Park as a comparative, but I would bet we'll see similar pricing. I remember their Bavarian pretzel with dipping sauce is something like $11 so that's what I'm expecting. And more like $7-9 pints. 



jeffl
apple44 said:
I agree it's pricey, but I find that's true with almost all of the great new places in the area and in other towns.
Owners spend a lot on rent (or buying a building), a ton on renovations, and liquor license costs are insane. I don't know how one can open a large place in a central area of SOMa and keep costs down.
Some folks keep asking when the "beer garden" (a restaurant and event space in the old Village Hall) is going to open. But what are people expecting? After spending a ton of money renovating an old, dilapidated building (which wasn't designed to be a restaurant in the first place), I'm guessing they're not going to be serving $3 PBRs.

 I completely understand the economic pressures these places feel. It’s a Catch 22.  They need to charge top dollar which may keep folks away who can find better value elsewhere.  


yahooyahoo
jeffl said:


apple44 said:
I agree it's pricey, but I find that's true with almost all of the great new places in the area and in other towns.
Owners spend a lot on rent (or buying a building), a ton on renovations, and liquor license costs are insane. I don't know how one can open a large place in a central area of SOMa and keep costs down.
Some folks keep asking when the "beer garden" (a restaurant and event space in the old Village Hall) is going to open. But what are people expecting? After spending a ton of money renovating an old, dilapidated building (which wasn't designed to be a restaurant in the first place), I'm guessing they're not going to be serving $3 PBRs.
 I completely understand the economic pressures these places feel. It’s a Catch 22.  They need to charge top dollar which may keep folks away who can find better value elsewhere.  

I don't mind higher prices as long as the food and service match the price points.  If they don't then the restaurant drops off of my list very quickly.



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