For Seniors and those with Seniors in their lives..

mtierney

I just had an encounter with hospital bait and switch practice again. I went to the ER and was impressed with the attention I received — getting a scan within 1-1/2 hrs and diagnosis within 3 hours!

I was moved to a room and I specifically asked if this meant I was admitted. I got a firm yes.

Two nights in, a front office woman came in with papers for me to sign. I surprised her by asking what was I signing. She said it was to tell Medicare that I was on for observation and checking out. 

I asked did she want me to fib as I had been told I was an admitted status patient.

Shocked, she said it was not really a fib, but a way to work the payment system!

I had had speedy response time when I was in the ER which had actually expedited push out the door. Had I been told that upfront, I would have been a willing party since I am a full time caretaker for my husband.

Turns out later that day my doc would not allow me to leave because I was still too sick!


Bottom line of this rant is that hospitals are not up front with patients — only interest is the bottom line.

More later perhaps...



mtierney
mtierney said:
I just had an encounter with hospital bait and switch practice again. I went to the ER and was impressed with the attention I received — getting a scan within 1-1/2 hrs and diagnosis within 3 hours!
I was moved to a room and I specifically asked if this meant I was admitted. I got a firm yes.
Two nights in, a front office woman


came in with papers for me to sign. I surprised her by asking what was I signing. She said it was to tell Medicare that I was on for observation and checking out. 
I asked did she want me to fib as I had been told I was an admitted status patient.
Shocked, she said it was not really a fib, but a way to work the payment system!
I had had speedy response time when I was in the ER which had actually expedited push out the door. Had I been told that upfront, I would have been a willing party since I am a full time caretaker for my husband.
Turns out later that day my doc would not allow me to leave because I was still too sick!


Bottom line of this rant is that hospitals are not up front with patients — only interest is the bottom line.
More later perhaps...this article which I posted earlier describing the scenario I posted above.

https://t.co/HdPxvGksXF?ssr=true

 


mtierney

It is good to learn that my families’ experiences with hospitalization are not unique to my area. 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/03/health/post-hospital-syndrome-elderly.html?rref=collection%2Fissuecollection%2Ftodays-new-york-times

I can confirm the taking of blood round the clock, often ruining the chance to get even a couple of hours sleep. Also, during my experience in May,  I was struck by the manical pursuit of a vein by nurses who seemed less adept than you might expect. I asked who was calling for all these tests? What doctor? As I came in through ER, I had not been in contact with my own physician. The answer was always the same: I don’t know, or “the lab”.

This article does provide me much comfort with the decision to keep my husband at home under hospice care. He died June 10th, comfortably in his own bed, surrounded by loved ones,  as was his choice. He had always returned home after hospitalizations with more health issues than before.


joan_crystal
mtierney said:
I
This article does provide me much comfort with the decision to keep my husband at home under hospice care. He died June 10th, comfortably in his own bed, surrounded by loved ones,  as was his choice. He had always returned home after hospitalizations with more health issues than before.

 Oh, I am so sorry to read this.  Please accept my deepest condolences.


mtierney

Anyone who has visited loved ones, with or without dementia, in a long term care facility can relate to the conditions mentioned in this article —isolation, memory loss, loneliness, etc — even in facilities rated highly. 

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/22/world/europe/dementia-care-treatment-symptoms-signs.html?rref=collection%2Fissuecollection%2Ftodays-new-york-times


joanne

This article highlights a new program welcoming visitors to the Queensland State Archives. 

It's thoughtfully designed, and makes wonderful use of the Archives' resources. D and I have previously visited special exhibitions the Archives have installed in the State Library based on the theme of Home and particular decades; the rooms were spectacularly evocative of place and time. 

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-16/memory-lounge-dementia/11162950

This might be a program idea that can be trialled in your area, or nearby.


meadesmith

This article highlights the need for older people to be assisted with technology while continuing to live on their own, in their own home. In this case, why didn't the carbon mono oxide detector activate. I lived with my niece( I was not able to live alone at that time) and the oven set off the detector. The fire dept came and took charge of the situation. There are a lot of safety features/devices that are important to maintain and monitor. Living alone now, I do get support from family and friends around this issue.



mtierney

I live alone in a house with an attached garage , so I understand the issue — I really don’t know how this tragedy happened. Perhaps there will be some follow up — I will post any new info here.


author
meadesmith said:
This article highlights the need for older people to be assisted with technology while continuing to live on their own, in their own home. In this case, why didn't the carbon mono oxide detector activate. I lived with my niece( I was not able to live alone at that time) and the oven set off the detector. The fire dept came and took charge of the situation. There are a lot of safety features/devices that are important to maintain and monitor. Living alone now, I do get support from family and friends around this issue.

 The usable life of a CO2detector is a few years.  After that it will beep a warning that it needs to be replaced.  Since CO2 is an inert gas......the detector can actually be placed on a table or any object waist high and not necessarily a ceiling.


Klinker

What you say is true but it is because CO2 is heavier than air, not because it is inert (practically speaking). 


author
Klinker said:
What you say is true but it is because CO2 is heavier than air, not because it is inert (practically speaking). 

 Just using the terminology handed to us by our building maintenance group.  I barely squeaked through high school chemistry and fled in terror at the thought of physics.  Had to find a friendly Doctor who wrote me a note so I could avoid the class because of my bone spurs


mtierney
Klinker said:
What you say is true but it is because CO2 is heavier than air, not because it is inert (practically speaking). 

 https://images.app.goo.gl/BtBwsJZSz29Mc4EH6


Klinker

No worries.  I have a tendency to be overly pedantic.


joanne

Part of the trouble with such beeping reminders for alarms is that people with hearing loss either might not hear the sound or might not understand what/where this sound is. My parents-in-law had a smoke detector that needed replacing but to them it sounded like crickets had nested in the roof or wall.  And recently a client complained to me of a cicada 'driving her nuts'. 


mtierney
Klinker said:
No worries.  I have a tendency to be overly pedantic.

 Pedantic doesn’t come to mind....


Klinker
mtierney said:


Klinker said:
No worries.  I have a tendency to be overly pedantic.
 Pedantic doesn’t come to mind....

 This is what you reply to????


LOL!


joanne
Klinker said:


mtierney said:

Klinker said:
No worries.  I have a tendency to be overly pedantic.
 Pedantic doesn’t come to mind....
 This is what you reply to????


LOL!

 cheese Different thread!



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