a section of fencing by my patio - Permit or no permit?

ffof

so...Ive read the ordinance about fencing, but thought I'd come here for clarity.  I am putting in one 5' section of lattice (a fence company is doing the work) next to my patio so I don't have to look at my own driveway/cars while enjoying the backyard AND also so that I can grow some clematis properly.  It is not near any property line.  

Permit needed?  or not needed?


thx


dano
ffof said:
so...Ive read the ordinance about fencing, but thought I'd come here for clarity.  I am putting in one 5' section of lattice (a fence company is doing the work) next to my patio so I don't have to look at my own driveway/cars while enjoying the backyard AND also so that I can grow some clematis properly.  It is not near any property line.  
Permit needed?  or not needed?


thx

 


dano

I would think that 1 panel shouldn’t be a big deal, as long as the neighbor doesn’t make a stink.


ffof
dano said:
I would think that 1 panel shouldn’t be a big deal, as long as the neighbor doesn’t make a stink.

 neighbors can't even see it!



ffof

I know, I think shouldn't be a big deal as well, but ordinance says a fence can't be more than 2' high OR 16 feet long.  Seems like a weird choice


joan_crystal

To play safe, I would recommend checking with the Building Department and getting their advance approval of the project.  Whether you are asking if you need a building permit for this project or whether it is permissible to place a five foot section of fencing where you want to place it, that is where you would get an authoritative reply.


mjc

Or - attach the lattice to a "raised bed" planter for the clematis, and think of it as a very substantial plant stake instead of a fence?  Worked for a neighbor here in Wisconsin, but i make no claims about Maplewood.


Apollo_T

I would just put it in, plant immediately and treat it as a trellis.


FilmCarp

I'm a big fan of permits, but this one I wouldn't worry about at all.  It's a garden trellis, not a fence.  Just do it and move on.


EricBurbank
Apollo_T said:
I would just put it in, plant immediately and treat it as a trellis.

 This.  But I wouldn't even worry about planting immediately.


mrincredible

I thought the township ordinance related to fences on your property line.  


EricBurbank

That is what I believe also but I didn't have the time to look it up.  


joan_crystal
mrincredible said:
I thought the township ordinance related to fences on your property line.  

There are set back requirements for the front of the property, two fronts if you have a property on a corner (including some curves).  There are additional requirements covering special circumstances such as swimming pools.


jfburch

I have similar--between my house and neighbor driveway.  I did check way back when and it was ok.

I think because it's short.  Worth a double check, but I think you are fine.


tomcat

A fence is on the property line.  Elsewhere (more than 5' from the property line), it is a trellis.


cleg
joan_crystal said:


mrincredible said:
I thought the township ordinance related to fences on your property line.  
There are set back requirements for the front of the property, two fronts if you have a property on a corner (including some curves).  There are additional requirements covering special circumstances such as swimming pools.

 I cannot find anything in the building code that mentions curves. The word corner is used, no mention of curves. I am certain a land use attorney could win the argument that a house on a curve, not at an intersection or crosswalk is not a corner. Not that it matters in any real way.


bklyngirl

sorry for the stupid question, but by properly line we mean the propertly line between 2 properties right?  been thinking about this lately, because i think I can replace a short fence (3 ft tall by 6 ft long maybe) that's inside my yard/property separating the front from the back.


joan_crystal
cleg said:
 I cannot find anything in the building code that mentions curves. The word corner is used, no mention of curves. I am certain a land use attorney could win the argument that a house on a curve, not at an intersection or crosswalk is not a corner. Not that it matters in any real way.

 In prior discussions regarding fencing, readers learned that some curves are treated as corners by the town.  In one case I recall reference was made to a property on the Crescent which was not at a corner specifically but still presented two sides to the roadway.  Intent here is traffic safety.  Fencing at that particular location would block line of sight for drivers coming around the bend in the road.  This is why I specified some curves, not all curves.




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